Tag Archives: Chiropractic

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

What are teenagers Growing Pains?

Growing Pains

Osgood Schlatters (OS), Larsen-Johansson (LJ) and Severs disease are common adolescent conditions that affect young rapidly growing athletes. These injuries occur where the muscle tendons attach to the bone. During a growth spurt the bones, muscles and tendons are all growing at different rates. If the muscles are tight they put extra stress on the bone resulting in inflammation and pain. In the case of OS and LJ the pain is felt at the knee, where Severs affects the heel. Many athletes are specializing in sport earlier and are engaging in year round training, how can you make sure your young athletes can continue to train during this stage of development without suffering from growing pains?

Injury Prevention Strategies

Risk Factor #1

The bones are growing faster than the muscles can adapt in terms of flexibility. Which puts a lot of stress on the muscle-tendon junctions, bone-tendon junctions, ligaments and growth cartilage.

Prevention strategy: Implement a regular stretching program focusing on the hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves, which have all been shown to be excessively tight during the adolescent growth spurt. Stretching should take place when the body is warm, i.e., at the end of your workout. Stretches need to be held for at least 30 seconds to be effective x 3 sets.

Hamstrings: Raise one foot onto a bench, lean forward bending from the hips and keeping your back straight. You should feel a stretch at the back of your leg.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

 

Quadriceps: Stand on one leg (holding onto to something for support if needed). Bend your opposite knee and bring your heel towards your buttock as you hold your foot with your hand. You should feel a stretch in the front of the leg.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Calves:

1. Gastrocs: Stand in front of a wall/bench and bring one leg back ensuring your toes are facing forward. Keep your heels on the ground and lean forward keeping the back leg straight. You should feel a stretch in the back leg.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

2. Soleus: From the same position as above bring your back foot forward. Make sure both heels stay on the ground and bend through your knees. You should feel a stretch in the back leg.growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

 

 

Risk Factor #2

“Adolescent Awkardness:” the athlete is growing at different rates and there is now an imbalance in strength and coordination.

Prevention strategy: Exercises focusing on glute strengthening, core stability and neuromuscular control. Stability and strength of the pelvis and spine help with proper mechanics and loading of the lower extremity in running, kicking, and changing directions. Perform the exercises below 2x/week for 10 repetitions and 3 sets.

GLUTE STRENGTHENING:
Start position for exercises below. Start in an athletic stance, both knees/hips slightly bent with your chest and head up. A band is wrapped around your knees or ankles. Your knees should be in line with your 2nd toe. Make sure your knees are not caving in (see bad/good form below).

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

 

1. Mini walks with a band: Start in an athletic stance. From this position take a step outwards and then feet back together again. Repeat 5-8 steps in one direction and then back in the other direction.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Single leg balance (with or without a band): Start in an athletic stance with a band around your knees for added difficulty. Keep one leg bent and raise the other leg out in a 45 degree angle. Hold for 5 seconds and return to start position and repeat on the other side.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

CORE STRENGTH:
Plank (with/without a ball pass): Start in a plank position from your elbows or hands, making sure your back stays flat and core stays tight. Hold for 30 seconds. For added difficulty hold the position while rolling the ball to a partner or wall.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Side plank: Place one hand on the ground, extend your legs out so you are in one straight line. The only thing touching the ground is your hand and the outside of one foot. Make sure your hips don’t sag towards the ground. Lift the top leg up for added difficulty. Hold for 20-30 sec and switch to the other side.

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

POSTURAL CONTROL:

Y balance exercise: You can use tape to draw a Y on the floor (or imagine a Y on the floor) while you are doing this exercise. Stand on 1 leg with the support knee slightly bent, while reaching out in three different directions with the opposite leg. Position 1 is in front, position 2 is out to the side and back, and position 3 is back and across to the opposite side. Perform each position once and repeat the cycle for 3-5 sets. Ensure your form is good, and your stance knee is staying in line with your 2nd toe (not caving in).

growing pain for teenagers Sheddon Physio Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

 

Risk Factor #3

Congested training schedule with very little rest

Prevention strategy: Modify your exercises and training if you are suffering from an injury. I.e., Single leg landing, jumping and sharp cutting drills puts a lot of stress on the knee and heel and will aggravate these injuries. Modify or eliminate these exercises as needed.

If you are the parent, coach, or trainer of a young growing athlete be proactive and chat with one of the therapists at Sheddon on injury prevention strategies.

For more info, contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at 905-849-4576.

We are located only 6 min East of Oakville Place and 4 min from Oakville & Milton Humane Society

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Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic Reputation in Oakville Mississauga

Our Reputation Says it All

When you’re searching for a Sports Medicine Clinic you need to do a little research and find a clinic that offers it all (they do exist) great therapists, flexible hours, expertise, and a commitment to work with you and get you better. How are you suppose to know if a clinic really is as good as they say they are? Over the past 15 years the owner of Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic (SPSC), Dana Clark, has worked hard to build a clinic that offers the best care in Halton. Doctors trust sending their patients to SPSC, family and friends refer people they know, and athletes/coaches put their teams health in the hands of the therapists at SPSC, because they all know it’s a clinic that will strive to get people better.

Doctor Referrals

Doctors, surgeons and specialists refer their patients to clinics that they know and trust will do a good job in getting their clients better. At SPSC we get referrals from 137 different doctors across Halton and the GTA. Last year alone we had 4819 new patients walking through our doors. The therapists at SPSC like to keep a close relationship with doctors, with patient consent, we send doctors reports on how patients are doing, what the treatment plan entails and let them know when further investigations may be required.

Expertise/Level of Therapists

At SPSC our mission is to offer the most up-to-date treatments by some of the best therapists in the Halton region. All of our therapists have completed extensive post-graduate education across a variety of specialties including concussion rehabilitation, acupuncture and several other manual therapy courses. We currently have 4 therapists who specialize in vestibular rehabilitation. We have 3 FCAMPT therapists, and many more on the way. Clinics with great therapists usually end up with long wait times. But at SPSC we have a large clinic with many experienced therapists, which helps keep our clinic hours open longer and on weekends, so getting an appointment is not a struggle.

Multi-disciplinary Team

SPSC offers expertise in Physiotherapy, Chiropractic, Athletic Therapy, Massage Therapy, Pedorthists and Sports Medicine Physicians. Having all these disciplines under one roof makes it more convenient for patients and easier for therapists to collaborate and communicate together to provide a more in depth approach to your rehabilitation. Having a Sports Medicine Physician on site 4 days a week is also a huge bonus, as she works with our therapists to help manage patients, guide rehabilitation, and facilitate referrals to specialists, diagnostic testing etc.

Focus on Sports Injuries and Athletes

Treating athletes is a whole different ballgame, and SPSC has been treating athletes of all ages and levels, including clientele from a variety of major sports teams and organizations, such as the TFC, NHL, OHL, national level swimmers, runners and Olympic athletes for over 10 years. We understand the demands and needs of athletes and strive to get them back to their sport as quickly and safely as possible. Sport teams/organizations in Oakville such as Oakville Aquatics, Athlete Training Center, F45, and Oakville Soccer Club have trusted SPSC as the preferred provider for their athletes for many years.

Concussion Management

Concussion management programs have become a major focus in sports medicine clinics due to increased public awareness and recognition of concussions. The therapists at SPSC have undergone extensive training with the Complete Concussion Management program (CCMI) in order to be educated with the most up to date concussion management strategies. Our statistics help demonstrate that we are a leading clinic in the GTA when it comes to concussion management, as we have successfully treated well over 700 concussions. We also offer the most comprehensive and research proven concussion baseline testing of any sports medicine clinic in the Mississauga and Oakville area. Teams and athletes from the Oakville Soccer Club, The Rangers Hockey team, as well as local football, rugby and other high risk athletes have trusted in our baseline testing for many years. To date we have completed over 800 baseline tests. If you want to organize a time for your team or group of athletes to come in and get their concussion baseline tests completed we do offer significantly discounted rates for teams/groups.

If you are looking for a Sports Medicine Clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area that has great therapists AND will get you results quickly, then contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at (905) 849-4576.

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Raising Awareness about Mental Health

One in five Canadians suffer from mental illness; however, more than two-thirds of these individuals never seek help because of the stigma surrounding mental illness. October 10th is World Mental Health Day, a day to raise awareness and educate people about mental illness in order to help change the negative stereotypes surrounding it, and hopefully encourage people to seek help.

Physiotherapists may feel more like psychologists as patients tend to develop a positive relationship with their therapist and feel that they can be honest and open about struggles outside of their physical injury. Although it is out of the scope of physiotherapy to treat mental illness, physiotherapists play a vital role in educating patients about different avenues they can explore to seek help, as well as recognizing when someone is a danger to themselves or others around them.

Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic treats a large number of athletes, and one would think that this population is fairly immune to mental illness. Exercise and physical activity have long been shown to help with mood disorders, depression and anxiety. Athletes are generally very driven, goal-oriented individuals, in exceptional shape physically. So it’s understandable that most people assume they are also mentally strong and healthy. However, athletes are still vulnerable to mental illness for many of the same reasons as the general population. Some common risk factors for mental health disorders in athletes include:

Overtraining/Burnout

 Athletes devout a large amount of their time and energy to their sport. With this comes the pressure to perform and excel, which can lead to stress, anxiety and depression. The heavy training schedule of many sports, combined with school, and in some cases work, can lead to fatigue and burnout in a large number of student athletes. Unfortunately, athletes rarely seek help for their psychological problems, for fear that they will be seen as weak and possibly lose their spot on a team. Athletes who do seek help will often be diagnosed with “overtraining.” The physiological, immunological, hormonal, and metabolic changes of over-training are very similar to those associated with depression. As such, some researchers have debated whether athletes with depression are actually being misdiagnosed with overtraining.

Eating Disorders

Many athletes feel the pressure to maintain a certain weight and body composition in order to be successful in their sport. Studies show that the prevalence of eating disorders in male athletes is roughly 18%, and anywhere from 32-60% in female athletes. Eating disorders are considered to be a mental illness caused by a number of psychological and sociocultural factors. In addition, eating disorders can occur with other mental health disorders, such as anxiety, depression, OCD and other mood disorders.

Injuries

An injury can bring a lot of stress and anxiety to athletes. They oftentimes feel pressure from coaches, teammates and parents to return to the game as soon as possible and in tip top shape. If athletes are playing on a scholarship or looking to get scouted to the next level, an injury can make them feel like their chances are at stake. They occasionally are unable to train/practice at the same level of their teammates and the longer the injury takes to heal, the more an athlete starts to feel they are slipping behind mentally and physically. Whether an injury is career ending or a minor sprain it will bring a host of negative emotions and can lead to further psychological issues.

Retirement

Since athletes commit all of their time and energy to training, their social circle and identity becomes strongly interconnected with their sport. As such, once their career is over they have lost their outlet, friends and identity. Retirement for athletes can be a time of great psychological distress, whether it is a decision made by the athlete or they are forced to retire due to aging, competitive failure or career ending injuries. Most athletes are not prepared for this life transition of entering into a world without extensive hours of practice, strict daily schedules and the adrenaline of competition. Athletes can feel a sense of emptiness, leading to depression and other mental health issues. Furthermore, retirement also shrinks your social support network, as athletes are no longer part of a team or group to which they can turn to for help.

Whether you are an elite athlete or an average Joe, we are all susceptible to mental health disorders. Keep in mind that mental illness can be treated and that you do not have to live through it alone. If you or someone you know may be suffering from a mental illness, please seek the appropriate assistance. If you’re not sure who to turn to, talk to a family member, friend, therapist or someone you trust that can help guide you in the right direction. Acknowledging that there is an issue is the first step to recovery.

Hughes et al., (2012). Setting the bar: athletes and vulnerability to mental illness. British Journal of Psychiatry. (2) 95-96.

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concussion management clinic Oakville Mississauga

Concussion Baseline Testing: Why You Need to Get Tested

There are still another few weeks of Summer to enjoy, but September is just around the corner and it marks the start of a new season for athletes who participate in football, hockey, soccer and many other high impact sports. It’s also the perfect time of year to get your concussion baseline testing completed. The most recent International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport suggest “completing comprehensive baseline tests prior to the start of the season offers health care professionals valuable and objective information to help them make difficult return to play decisions. It also provides an additional educative opportunity to teach athletes about concussions. Furthermore, the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Ontario Psychological Association, The Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine, and the Center for Disease and Control all support and recommend the use of baseline testing in high-risk athletes to help manage concussions and the return to play decision making.

Unfortunately, there is no single clinical test that can be done to know when an athlete has fully recovered from a concussion. Furthermore, symptom resolution occurs much sooner than brain recovery, which may put athletes at risk for returning to sport too quickly, especially if sport clearance is based solely on symptoms. How are health practitioners, coaches and parents supposed to know when an athlete is ready to return to sport? In order to know when an athlete has fully recovered, the different areas of the brain that could potentially be affected with a concussion must be assessed, including:

  • Balance;
  • Strength;
  • Reaction time;
  • Neurocognitive performance;
  • and visual processing.

These different test results need be compared to pre-injury values in order to know when an athlete has returned to their normal pre-concussion baseline values. As such, the best way to ensure that you return to sport safely following a concussion is to get baseline tested before a concussion even occurs. At Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic we offer the most comprehensive concussion baseline testing of any sports medicine clinic in the Mississauga and Oakville area.

Why choose us for baseline testing?

Most clinics will tell you that they provide concussion baseline testing, but that doesn’t mean they do it properly. Traditional baseline programs focus solely on computerized neuropsychological tests, such as the ImPACT test. Although vital for assessing neurocognitive function, the Canadian Academy of Sports Medicine (CASM) suggests that neuropsychological tests should not be used in isolation, since they only address one aspect of concussion. In order to properly manage concussions a baseline test must be multidimensional, assessing the full spectrum of concussion outcomes (i.e., balance, reaction time, visual processing, physical capacity).

All of the therapists at Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic have undergone extensive training with the Complete Concussion Management program in order to be educated with the most recent research-proven concussion management strategies. CASM and the Canadian Concussion Collaborative strongly promote a multidisciplinary approach to concussion management, which extends beyond the family doctor to include health care professionals with developed skills and expertise in concussions. Sheddon currently has 11 highly trained therapists qualified to assess and treat concussions, including, a sports medicine physician, chiropractor, athletic therapist and several physiotherapists. With such a large staff trained in concussions we offer flexible hours and days for assessments, baseline testing and treatment.

We are one of the top private clinics in Canada in volume of concussion baseline testing through Complete Concussion Managaement. In addition, we have successfully treated hundreds of sports-related concussions and have an extensive network of specialists, including a sports medicine physician, vestibular physiotherapists, chiropractors and athletic therapists. We offer the highest quality of concussion testing and management in the Mississauga and Oakville area. If you are interested in learning more about our baseline testing for individual athletes or teams, please contact us at 905-849-4576

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Prevention and Treatment of Groin Injuries in Athletes Sheddon Physio Mississauga

Prevention & Treatment of Groin Injuries in Athletes

Groin injuries affect roughly 20% of soccer players due to the nature of the sport, which involves lots of kicking, inside passing and changes of direction. These movements put a large eccentric force on the adductor muscles, which puts them at risk for injury. As such, roughly 70% of soccer related groin injuries involve the adductor muscles, with the adductor longus being the most frequently injured. Injury to these muscles is usually due to overuse and muscle imbalance, two factors that can be modified with a good prevention program.

The adductor muscles consist of a group of muscles in the inner thigh that work together to move one leg in towards the other. They also assist with other hip movements, as well as balancing the pelvis. They are injured during soccer from kicking, changing direction, reaching and sprinting. Risk factors for injury include:

  • Athletes with muscle imbalances around the hip/pelvis/core;
  • Adductor muscle tightness or weakness;
  • Higher level of play;
  • Previous groin injury;
  • Hip adductor to abductor muscle imbalance.

Treatment will initially be focused on controlling pain and maintaining range of motion. Depending on the severity of the injury, your therapist may also teach you how to wrap the groin in order to relieve pain. As the pain subsides other treatment strategies will be implemented such as soft tissue techniques, modalities to encourage healing, as well as a strong emphasis on exercise. Exercise will focus on the adductors, as well as the core and pelvic musculature. Reintegration into sport specific training will focus on cutting, sprinting, passing and progressive kicking exercises to improve stance leg loading and kicking leg impact. At Sheddon we use the SKLZ Star Kick Elite, a solo soccer trainer,  that returns the ball with true rolls and bounces to help players build passing, receiving and shooting skills.groin injuries in soccer players sheddon sports clinic mississauga

No athlete wants to be sidelined with an injury. Be proactive and follow the injury prevention recommendations below to ensure you stay injury free:

  • Work your CORE: core and pelvic stability can prevent groin and many other injuries;
  • Make sure your hip/pelvis muscles are well balanced in terms of flexibility, coordination and strength.
  • Following the FIFA 11+ warm up program can prevent many injuries, including to the groin.
  • Slowly integrate large amounts of isolated inside passing and kicking into training, as too much has been shown to increase the risk of groin injuries.
  • Specific exercises to strengthen the adductor muscles pre-season have been shown to reduce groin injuries. One of the exercises researchers have focused on is the Copenhagen Adduction exercise (see photo below). Completing this exercise 2-3x/wk, 3 sets, with 6-15 reps per side can significantly increase eccentric adductor strength, thereby reducing the likelihood of groin injuries.Copenhagen Adduction exercise Sheddon Physio Oakville
  • If the Copenhagen Adduction exercise is a little too advanced for you, other researchers showed benefits from strengthening with a theraband. See photo below. This exercise should be completed 3x/wk, 3 sets, 15 reps.injury prevention strengthening with a theraband

If you have been suffering from groin pain or want to prevent groin injuries, contact one of our therapists at Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic, who will assess and treat your injury and get you back on the field pain-free.

Haroy et al., (2017). Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players. A Randomized Control Trial. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 45;13;3052-3059.

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