Category Archives: injury prevention

Why GOLFERS Need to Lift Weights from Sheddon Physio Clinic Oakville

Why GOLFERS Need to Lift Weights!!

While Halton is covered in mounds of snow, not many people are thinking about the upcoming golf season. However, this is the perfect time of year to start tailoring your exercise program or to have any current injuries addressed in order to ensure that you hit the links stronger and pain free.

If you look at today’s top golfers, most, if not all, do some form of strength training. The golf swing involves powerful muscle contractions coming from multiple body parts. The key areas to focus on are the rotator cuff    and scapular stabilizers, the trunk and core musculature, and the glutes and hip extensors.

What are the benefits of lifting weights?

1. More strength equals more speed/force;

2. Reduces golf specific injuries by 30-50%;

3. Results in longer drives and distance on your iron shots;

4. May increase your accuracy and consistency;

5. Can increase your putting distance control

Strength gains generally take up to 8 weeks of consistent training before seeing any progress. Don’t wait until the snow melts and courses open. Get ready now and spend the warmer weather at the range and on the course working on your technique. Not sure where to start? Get assessed at Sheddon Physiotherapy, where Jason Kobrick and Erin Shapcott have both completed their golf specific rehabilitation courses and can help answer any of your questions.

Stay tuned for our next Blog discussing Golf and Mobility.

Tara Campbell sports physiotherapist Sheddon Oakville

Welcome New Physiotherapist Tara Campbell

Tara graduated from Queen Margaret University, Scotland with a Masters of Science, Honors in Physiotherapy. Prior to her physiotherapy studies, she gained her Bachelor of Arts, Kinesiology degree from Western University in London Ontario. Tara enjoys keeping busy with many sports and hobbies, including field hockey, downhill skiing, yoga, cooking, hiking and ultimate frisbee. She played for the women’s varsity field hockey team during her undergraduate degree at Western, and continued to play while at school in Scotland. Tara has experience with soccer and football team therapy, volunteer experience at the Lithuanian Olympics and elderly rehabilitation programs. Through her education and personal experiences, Tara is dedicated to helping clients achieve their rehabilitation, fitness and wellness goals.  Tara is pursuing advanced concussion training with Complete Concussion Management, and will be working towards Medical Acupuncture Licensing. As an enthusiastic, engaging therapist, Tara loves that she is able to work with new and returning clients everyday. Further, Tara is committed to continuous learning, and is eager to advance her clinical education. 

soccerLE 1

Soccer and Injury Prevention in the Lower Extremity

Soccer is one of the most widely played sports by children, teens and adults. It also has one of the highest injury rates among all sports and across all levels from beginners, weekend warriors to professional athletes. The majority of these injuries occur in the lower extremity due to the amount of footwork required during twisting, turning, jumping, landing and tackling. In this article we will discuss the most common lower extremity injuries in soccer, as well as prevention strategies that coaches, trainers and athletes can start implementing right away to keep athletes healthy on the field.

Common Lower Extremity Injuries

ACL Injuries

ACL injuries continue to be one of the most common and devastating sporting injuries. They are frequent in soccer, and 80% of the time they occur during non-contact activities such as cutting, pivoting and landing. Once an athlete has suffered an ACL injury, they are 25% more likely to injure the opposite ACL or reinjure the same one. The good news is that ACL injuries are preventable. Research has shown preventative ACL programs can decrease the risk of ACL injuries by 24-82%, with these rates being higher in females and younger athletes.

What can you do right now to keep your ACL injury free?

  • Start a prevention program at an early age and stick with it. Those who started an ACL neuromuscular training program young (pre-puberty), and actually stuck with it on a regular basis (3x/week for 20-30 min at a time) were less likely to sustain an ACL injury.
  • Fix your biomechanics. Faulty movement patterns during landing and cutting put a lot of strain on the ACL and are one of the main risk factors for injury. A dynamic assessment can identify any biomechanical errors and help establish an individualized exercise program to fix them.
  • Do a variety of exercises. There isn’t one magical exercise that will strengthen your ACL. A typical program will focus on balance, proprioceptive exercises, single leg stability, jump training, plyometrics, and agility drills.
  • Strength training! Key muscles play a role in preventing knee injuries, including the core muscles, hip abductors and hip external rotators.
  • Rehab your injuries. Whether it’s your hip, ankle or knee, you need to address the injury sooner rather than later in order to prevent long-term problems and further injury. For example, ankle instability (i.e., from ankle sprains) can put you at an increased risk for ACL injury. More specifically, if your ankle is unstable during landing and cutting, the knee will be loaded abnormally, putting more strain on the ACL.
  • Start using a warm up program like FIFA 11+, which consists of a dynamic warm up combined with strengthening, balance exercises, and plyometric drills. It has been shown to be effective in decreasing all lower extremity injuries, especially ACL injuries. However, its maximum benefit is with athletes who perform the program on a regular long-term basis.

Hamstring and Calf Injuries

Injuries to the hamstring and calf muscles are common among soccer players due to the repetitive kicking, sprinting and jumping involved in the sport. Re-injury of these muscles is also an issue affecting many athletes long term, with roughly 30% of athletes suffering a re-injury to the hamstring, and 63% to the Achilles within 2 years after initial injury. Continue reading more here.

Ankle Injuries

Roughly 35% of all soccer injuries occur in the ankle, with an average time lost from play of about 48 days. With the high prevalence and long recovery time associated with ankle injuries, identifying modifiable risk factors and prevention strategies is key to keeping athletes healthy on the field. Continue reading more here.

If you’re currently injured, book an appointment with one of our physiotherapists, chiropractors, athletic therapists or massage therapists in order to help get you back on the field healthy and pain-free. If you’re not currently injured, the therapists at Sheddon can get you started on an injury prevention and strengthening program by working on your specific weaknesses and imbalances to help prevent any future injuries. If you’re looking for a sports medicine clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area that has great therapists AND will get you results quickly, contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at 905-849-4576.

Nessler et al. (2017). ACL Injury Prevention: What does the research tell us? Curr Rev Musculoskeletal Med. 10:281-288.

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progressive core rotational strengthening sheddonphysio 2

Core Strength and Injury Prevention, patient exercise

When people hear about the benefits of core strength and injury prevention, they usually think of lower back weakness and kegels.

While core strength is essential in the prevention and rehabilitation of lower back injuries, it plays a much bigger role in overall function and sports performance, and goes well beyond the kegel exercise. Core strength plays a major role in posture, strength, coordination and power in all types of activities from running to throwing.

At Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic in Oakville we assess both static and dynamic core stability as it relates to your sport. From our assessment findings specific core exercises will be prescribed and progressed to prevent injury and improve athletic performance.

Basic core exercises initially teach how to recruit the core muscles. Once this can be done successful, various progressions can be used to challenge the core by adding limb movements, unstable surfaces and different forms of resistance.

The video below demonstrates a core stability progression exercise, which incorporates functional extremity movements and resistance.

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volleyball athlete injury prevention

Train Smarter for Injury Prevention

Athletes of all ages and skill levels are being pressured with more and more commitments regarding training, practices, games and tournaments. Back in the day, extra skill development, strength and conditioning, and mental skill training were reserved for “elite” athletes. Nowadays, all athletes want that competitive edge. In order to improve fitness and skill development, athletes need to push their training to greater limits. If an athlete “under trains” they risk injury due to being under prepared. If an athlete “over trains”, they risk injury due to fatigue and overuse. The key is finding the “perfect” amount of training AND recovery in order to achieve the optimal training benefits, without risk of injury. Unfortunately, there is no “one size fits all” training program, as each athlete responds differently to training, based on internal and external factors. The tips below will help coaches, trainers, parents and athletes train smarter for optimal performance benefits:

1. Periodization: A poorly managed training and competition schedule can increase risk of injury, if training isn’t well planned throughout the season. For example, injuries are most likely to occur following repetitive and rapid increases in training intensity, frequency or duration, especially if the training greatly exceeds the fitness level of the athlete. While it is okay to train hard and push athletes, coaches/trainers need to be mindful of how the athletes are responding. A hard training week, resulting in athlete fatigue, should not be followed by an even harder week. Athletes need time to recover and adapt.

2. Offseason Conditioning: Ensure adequate off-season and pre-season physical/psychological training so that athletes are in top shape when the season begins.

3. Recovery: Following intense training periods and tournaments athletes will have a temporary decrease in physical performance, neuromuscular control and muscular strength that can take up to 5 days to return to baseline levels. In addition, muscular fatigue from cumulative training days will compromise coordination, decision making and joint stability, all of which can lead to acute injuries, such as ACL tears. Recovery days are key to building stronger athletes.

4. Monitoring: Athletes need to be monitored in terms of physical performance, emotional well-being, stress and fatigue. This can be easily achieved with training logs and monthly questionnaires, and training should be adjusted accordingly.

5. Injury surveillance: Overuse injuries need to be caught early in order to avoid prolonged time off sport. As such, monitor your athletes for changes in performance and compensatory patterns, since most athletes will ignore early signs of injury.

6. Emotional well-being: Psychological stress has been shown to increase muscle tension, narrow the visual field and lead to increase distractibility, all of which can increase risk of injury. Be aware of athletes’ mental state (anxiety, stress, nervousness), as it plays a huge role in injury susceptibility. Provide a supportive and strong social support network within the team, including players, coaches and trainers.

7. Healthy behaviours: Training hard in the gym and on the field is only one piece of the puzzle. Athletes need to be aware of the importance of adequate sleep and nutrition.

Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic has a team of athletic therapists, massage therapists, chiropractors, physiotherapists and sports medicine doctors who can help get you back on the field healthy and pain-free. If you’re looking for a sports medicine clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area that has great therapists AND will get you results quickly, contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at 905-849-4576.

Soligard et al., (2016). How much is too much? International Olympic Commttee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 50:17.

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