Concussions are a hot topic, especially regarding the potential for long term health issues. The recent Hollywood movie “Concussion” is based around some current research that has looked at concussions and its association with long term depression and suicide in NFL athletes. With the growing media coverage around concussions, and numerous professional athletes stating long term debilitating effects due to concussions, parents are starting to doubt putting their kids in high-risk sports such as football and hockey. A recent poll in the States found that roughly 40-45% of parents are considering pulling their kids out of contact sports such as football, hockey and wrestling, due to the higher risk of sustaining a concussion. Fortunately, there is lots of research and public awareness surrounding concussions, which is educating parents, coaches and athletes. Unfortunately, along with this increase in concussion knowledge comes potentially misleading information, which is either not fully supported by research or in the early stages of development.

Last month a group of researchers out of the University of Toronto published a study on the risk of suicide post concussion (Fralick et al., 2016). Their results were not very optimistic, as they found that adults with a diagnosis of concussion had an increased long term risk of suicide 3 times the population norm. These results quickly got picked up by