Tag Archives: Sports Medicine

The Most Effective Hamstring Injury Prevention Program

Hamstring injuries have been reported as one of the most common injuries across a variety of sports that involve repetitive kicking and/or high speed running, such as soccer, track and field, football, and rugby. Re-injury rates are also an issue affecting many athletes long term, with roughly 30% of athletes suffering a re-injury to the hamstring within the first year. In order to prevent hamstring injuries it is important to understand WHY they occur, and to develop a prevention program which targets these risk factors.

The hamstrings are a group of 3 muscles, the biceps femoris, the semitendinosus, and the semimembranosus. Their main purpose is to bring the hip back and bend the knee. The majority of injuries to the hamstrings are strains to the biceps femoris long head muscle. Injury occurs mainly during sprinting, as the muscles contract eccentrically to decelerate the leg.

What are the Risk Factors?

Age
Unfortunately, the older you get, the higher your chance for hamstring injury. The age when the risk starts to significantly increase is 25 years old, with research suggesting a 30% increase in risk annually thereafter.

Decreased flexibility
Tight hamstrings aren’t the only problem; tight hip flexors and/or quads are also problematic.

Muscle Imbalance/weakness
Muscle imbalance within the lumbopelvic region and/or weakness in the hamstrings;

Previous injury
Previous injury to the hamstring, groin and/or knee.

The Most Effective Hamstring Prevention Program

Eccentric Strengthening Program
The majority of hamstring injuries occur during sprinting when the muscle is working eccentrically. As such, eccentric strengthening programs have been shown to decrease the risk of hamstring injury by 65-70%. The most popular and widely studied exercise for hamstring injury prevention is The Nordic Hamstring Exercise. We strongly encourage all athletes to add this exercise to their strengthening regime. However, it shouldn’t be the only hamstring exercise you do. While it has been shown to decrease the risk of hamstring injury significantly, it only activates part of the hamstring muscles (specifically the semitendinosus and short head of the biceps femoris). 80% of hamstring injuries occur to the long head of the biceps femoris, which is better activated with a hip extension exercise such as deadlifts. The most effective hamstring injury prevention program should focus on targeting all the hamstring muscles with both knee and hip dominant movements. Below you will find 2 different exercises: the nordic hamstring exercise and straight leg weighted deadlifts. We recommend doing both for the greatest benefit. See a progressive 12 week schedule below:

Frequency 2x/week x 12 weeks.
Week 1-3: 3 sets of 5-6 reps
Week 4-6: 4 sets of 6-7 reps
Week 7-9: 4 sets of 8-9 reps
Week 10-12: 4 sets of 10-12 reps

Nordic Hamstring Exercise: Can be completed with a partner holding your legs or hooking feet under something heavy. Lower yourself forward, keeping your back and hips straight. Once you cannot go any further push yourself back into start position.

 

Weighted Deadlifts:

Work on your core
While strengthening the hamstrings is important, you can’t forget about everything else that helps support, align and coordinate the hips. If there is an imbalance around the hip such as tight hip flexors, weak glutes, etc., the hamstrings will be more susceptible to injury. In addition, exercise programs that focus on trunk stabilization and agility vs. a traditional program of ONLY hamstring stretching and strengthening post injury results in a quicker return to sport and significantly much lower reoccurrence rate (7% vs. 70%).

Running Program
Most hamstring injuries occur during sprinting, especially later in the game when fatigue sets in. Therefore, strengthening and isolating the hamstrings in the gym is essential, but you must also include interval speed training to improve coordination, large hip/knee joint torques, and explosive strength. Weekly sprint workouts have been shown to prevent hamstring injuries. Like all training loads, ensure the sprinting load (distance, reps and speed) is progressed gradually.

Where to go from here?

If you currently are suffering from a hamstring injury it is best to book an appointment with a therapist and get on an individualized rehab plan. If you are currently injury free and would like to stay that way, then add the above hamstring exercises to your current strengthening program following the 12-week plan. If you want more bang for your buck, then add some core and hip stability exercises as well. If you still have questions or want more guidance on injury prevention book an appointment with one of the Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Medicine therapists at 905-849-4576.

Heiderscheit et al., (2010). Hamstring strain injuries: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Rehabilitation and Injury Prevention. Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. 67-81.
Liu et al., (2012). Injury rate, mechanism, and risk factors of hamstring strain injuriesin sports. A review of the literature. Journal of Sport and Health Science. 92-101.
Prior et al., (2009). An evidence based approach to hamstring strain injury. A systematic review of the literature. Sports Health. 154-164.

F45 Fitness Training Oakville

How Does F45 Training Complement Sports Medicine?

Goodlife, LA fitness, Crossfit or Lifetime? There are so many gym and fitness options for people to choose from. How can someone know what is right for them? One of the newest gyms to start popping up everywhere in the GTA over the past year are F45 Training gyms. What is F45 Training? How is it different from other gyms? Is it right for you? Recently I had the opportunity to get my butt kicked by their workouts and sit down with the owner of F45 Training Joshua Creek, Vanessa & Dan Andrews, to answer all these questions for you.

Lets start with the basics “What is F45 Training”?

“F” stands for functional fitness; “45” is the total number of minutes each workout lasts. In a nutshell, F45 Training is a group exercise class focusing on high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and functional fitness movements. Every day offers is a different program (there are 31 different programs and over 3000 different exercises), so you will NEVER see the same workout twice.

Can every level do F45 Training?

F45 is geared to all fitness levels. Every F45 gym has video monitors to demonstrate the exercise technique at each station. In addition, the trainers spend the first few minutes of every class demonstrating each exercise, as well as showing ways to modify it in order to make it harder or easier. Trainers will also float around the room during class to help people modify the exercises as needed. Whether you are just getting into fitness and need a little hand holding and motivation, or you’re an athlete looking for a new challenge, F45 may be right for you.

Is F45 Training good for losing weight, building muscle or cross training for sports?

ALL OF THE ABOVE! F45 workouts combine interval, cardiovascular and strength training. All of which are proven to be effective workout methods for burning fat and building lean muscle.

How can F45 Training help Sheddon clients get stronger after an injury?

Once a patient has been cleared to return to the gym, F45 is a great option since it focuses on building functional fitness. Functional fitness focuses on movements that people need in order to function everyday. As a physiotherapist, I laugh when people tell me they avoid squats. Squats are essential for life, you need to squat to get on/off the toilet. Going to a gym and strictly working on isolating different muscles on different machines will get you stronger in those isolated movements. However, everyday life, sports and work activities don’t normally happen in isolation. Multiple muscles need to work together to perform movements such as carrying, lifting, pulling, pushing, etc. That’s why functional fitness and F45 is beneficial for injury prevention and post injury to get you stronger.

How can the trainers at F45 Training work together with therapists at Sheddon?

The team at Sheddon will gladly get in touch with the trainers at F45 and give them an update on what you can/cannot be doing. Based on these guidelines the trainers will modify the exercises as needed. There will be ongoing communication between the trainers and your therapist to ensure your safety and to prevent injury.

How can F45 Training prevent injuries?

Functional fitness focuses on muscles working together which will help get you stronger for doing everyday activities (i.e., lifting a child, carrying a heavy load, crawling on the floor with a grandchild, etc.). It improves your strength, cardio, mobility, flexibility and core stability. The programs are well balanced and target the whole body.

What do people love about F45?

  1. It’s fun!
  2. Every workout is different so people don’t get bored or plateau; they are constantly challenged and improving.
  3. Every F45 gym is like a small community where members motivate and challenge each other.
  4. F45 gyms take pride in staying super duper clean, no sweaty mats or dirty equipment.

If you want to know more about F45 Training Joshua Creek check out their website and contact Vanessa or Dan here https://f45training.ca/joshuacreek/. They also offer a free one week trial to see if it’s right for you.

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James-White massage therapy Sheddon Sports Clinic Oakville

Welcome new Massage Therapist: James White

Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic is excited to introduce our newest Massage Therapist James White. James is currently working Tuesday evenings and Saturdays.

James graduated from the University of Windsor in 2015, completing a Bachelor of Human Kinetics, specializing in Movement Science. He then enrolled in Sutherland-Chan School of Massage Therapy and completed their Advanced Standing Option for Health Professionals, graduating in 2016. He had student clinic experiences at Toronto General Hospital, Princess Margaret Lodge, Toronto Lyndhurst Rehab Centre, and performed treatments at the 2016 Bay Street Hoops Charity Basketball Tournament and the 2015 Scotiabank Marathon.  He is trained in Swedish techniques, sports massage, deep tissue massage, trigger point release, and fascial release. He has knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, remedial exercises, rhythmic techniques, and self-care. James has treated athletes, pregnant mothers, senior citizens, children, as well as cancer, thoracic surgery, and spinal rehabilitation patients.

When he is not treating, James can be found playing soccer in a recreational league, volunteering at his church’s youth group, or waiting for the NFL’s Chicago Bears to win the Super Bowl.

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new staff at Sheddon Physiotherapy Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Welcome New Team Members at SPSC

Throughout the Summer and Fall, Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic welcomed some new members to our team. Learn a little about each new team member below.

Stephani Oolup, Registered Physiotherapist

Sheddon Physioyherapy Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga Stephanie PA staffStephani completed her Masters of Physiotherapy Studies degree at the University of Queensland in Australia, where she also worked for a year before moving home to Toronto. She grew up participating in a wide variety of sports, from swimming, to rugby and snowboarding, trying pretty much everything in-between. This, in conjunction with her physio degree, has taught her to greatly value and respect the movement and strength our bodies can offer. She is passionate about continuing to learn and share knowledge regarding human mobility, pain and the rehabilitation process.

Sarah Tanner, Physiotherapist Assistant

Sheddon Physioyherapy Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga Sarah PA staffSarah holds a Diploma in Physiotherapy/Occupational Therapy Assistant, graduating from Mohawk College in the summer of 2017. During her time in school she competed her hours at the Hamilton General Hospital in acute care, rehabilitation floor and ICU, working along side doctors, nurses, physiotherapist and occupational therapist.  Patients would range from spinal cord injures, strokes, amputee, trauma, and acquired brain injuries. Outside of the clinic hours Sarah enjoys horseback riding and training young horses for friends and clients.

Natalie Fisher, Physiotherapist Assistant

Natalie graduated from Mohawk College in the Occupational Therapist Assistant and Physiotherapist Assistant program in 2017 and Health, Wellness and Fitness program in 2015. Natalie  played a variety of sports growing up but pursued her love for basketball as she played on the varsity women’s basketball at Mohawk College for 4 years.  When Natalie has spare time, she coaches the Special Olympics Basketball team for the Niagara Region and spending time with her family.

 

 

Mark McEntee, Physiotherapist Assistant

Sheddon Physioyherapy Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga Mark PA staffMark  graduated from Mohawk College in the Occupational Therapist Assistant and Physiotherapist Assistant program. Mark is also the owner/operator of a personal training studio where he taught a variety of classes from spin to sport specific coaching. Mark is a certified strength and conditioning coach, certified spin instructor and holds a black belt in judo, kickboxing and jujitsu. Marks hobbies include teaching self defense/MMA classes, strength training, running, cycling and swimming. Most importantly he loves spending time with his wife and 2 girls.

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Pakmen volleyball players Mississauga

4 Ways to Prevent Ankle Injuries in Volleyball Players

Roughly 20% of volleyball players will suffer an injury at some point in their career, with ankle sprains making up roughly 50% of all injuries experienced in volleyball athletes across all skill levels. Luckily, ankle sprains can be prevented with education and coaching on proper skill techniques/mechanics, as well as specific conditioning exercises such as balance and proprioceptive exercises. The therapists at Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic have worked with numerous volleyball players from young athletes just learning the sport to higher-level rep players from clubs in Oakville/Mississauga such as Pakmen Volleyball. The team at SPSC can help identify athletes at risk for injury as well as quickly and efficiently rehabilitate volleyball athletes who have suffered an injury.

Causes/Risk Factors

Most ankle sprains (89%) occur around the net from landing after a block or an attack. They generally result from stepping on the foot of an opponent or a teammate. The greatest risk factor for an ankle sprain is a previous history of ankle injuries, especially if it occurred in the past 6-12 months and was not rehabilitated properly.

Prevention Strategies:

  1. One of the most effective prevention strategies is education and training regarding proper take off and landing technique during blocking and attacks. More specifically, players should be taught to jump straight up to hit the ball, instead of forward, so that they will not land on the centre line under the net. In addition, players need to practice take off and landing during 2 man blocks.
  2. Proprioceptive training to improve stability and balance. Proprioceptive exercises should be included in every warm up, and should only take 5 minutes to complete. They will generally involve the use of balance boards, bosu, trampolines, and ladders. For example: a. player standing on one leg and tosses a ball to another player or against wall 10/leg x 5 sets. B. Single leg stance on the balance board/bosu for 30 sec x 2 sets. C. Mini squats on balance board 10x 2 sets. D. Ladder drills to work on agility and coordination.
  3. Proper rehabilitation post ankle injury in order to prevent reoccurrence.
  4. The use of support (brace or tape) to protect the ankle. Research has shown that bracing/taping decreases the incidence of ankle sprains in previously sprained ankles, but not in previously uninjured ankles. The greatest risk of reinjury is during the first year post ankle sprain, due to weakness in the ligament and proprioceptive ability, as such athletes should brace/tape for the first year post injury.

Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic has been treating athletes of all ages and skill levels for over 10 years in the Oakville and Mississauga area. If you’re currently injured, book an appointment with one of our physiotherapists, chiropractors, athletic therapists or massage therapists in order to help get you back on the court healthy and pain-free. If you’re not currently injured, the therapists at Sheddon can get you started on an injury prevention and strengthening program by working on your specific weaknesses and imbalances to help prevent any future injuries. If you’re looking for a sports medicine clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area that has great therapists AND will get you results quickly, then contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at 905-849-4576.

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