Tag Archives: Oakville Physiotherapy

Our Reputation Says it All

When you’re searching for a Sports Medicine Clinic you need to do a little research and find a clinic that offers it all (they do exist) great therapists, flexible hours, expertise, and a commitment to work with you and get you better. How are you suppose to know if a clinic really is as good as they say they are? Over the past 15 years the owner of Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic (SPSC), Dana Clark, has worked hard to build a clinic that offers the best care in Halton. Doctors trust sending their patients to SPSC, family and friends refer people they know, and athletes/coaches put their teams health in the hands of the therapists at SPSC, because they all know it’s a clinic that will strive to get people better.

Doctor Referrals

Doctors, surgeons and specialists refer their patients to clinics that they know and trust will do a good job in getting their clients better. At SPSC we get referrals from 137 different doctors across Halton and the GTA. Last year alone we had 4819 new patients walking through our doors. The therapists at SPSC like to keep a close relationship with doctors, with patient consent, we send doctors reports on how patients are doing, what the treatment plan entails and let them know when further investigations may be required.

Expertise/Level of Therapists

At SPSC our mission is to offer the most up-to-date treatments by some of the best therapists in the Halton region. All of our therapists have completed extensive post-graduate education across a variety of specialties including concussion rehabilitation, acupuncture and several other manual therapy courses. We currently have 4 therapists who specialize in vestibular rehabilitation. We have 3 FCAMPT therapists, and many more on the way. Clinics with great therapists usually end up with long wait times. But at SPSC we have a large clinic with many experienced therapists, which helps keep our clinic hours open longer and on weekends, so getting an appointment is not a struggle.

Multi-disciplinary Team

SPSC offers expertise in Physiotherapy, Chiropractic, Athletic Therapy, Massage Therapy, Pedorthists and Sports Medicine Physicians. Having all these disciplines under one roof makes it more convenient for patients and easier for therapists to collaborate and communicate together to provide a more in depth approach to your rehabilitation. Having a Sports Medicine Physician on site 4 days a week is also a huge bonus, as she works with our therapists to help manage patients, guide rehabilitation, and facilitate referrals to specialists, diagnostic testing etc.

Focus on Sports Injuries and Athletes

Treating athletes is a whole different ballgame, and SPSC has been treating athletes of all ages and levels, including clientele from a variety of major sports teams and organizations, such as the TFC, NHL, OHL, national level swimmers, runners and Olympic athletes for over 10 years. We understand the demands and needs of athletes and strive to get them back to their sport as quickly and safely as possible. Sport teams/organizations in Oakville such as Oakville Aquatics, Athlete Training Center, F45, and Oakville Soccer Club have trusted SPSC as the preferred provider for their athletes for many years.

Concussion Management

Concussion management programs have become a major focus in sports medicine clinics due to increased public awareness and recognition of concussions. The therapists at SPSC have undergone extensive training with the Complete Concussion Management program (CCMI) in order to be educated with the most up to date concussion management strategies. Our statistics help demonstrate that we are a leading clinic in the GTA when it comes to concussion management, as we have successfully treated well over 700 concussions. We also offer the most comprehensive and research proven concussion baseline testing of any sports medicine clinic in the Mississauga and Oakville area. Teams and athletes from the Oakville Soccer Club, The Rangers Hockey team, as well as local football, rugby and other high risk athletes have trusted in our baseline testing for many years. To date we have completed over 800 baseline tests. If you want to organize a time for your team or group of athletes to come in and get their concussion baseline tests completed we do offer significantly discounted rates for teams/groups.

If you are looking for a Sports Medicine Clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area that has great therapists AND will get you results quickly, then contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at (905) 849-4576.

Questions? Contact us

lower body injuries prevention Oakville Mississauga

Your Guide to Lower Body Injuries

1. ACL Injury

What is it? The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the strongest ligaments in your knee that provides stability, and prevents excessive forward and rotational movement. During injury it can be stretched, partial torn or fully torn.
Why does it happen? These injuries are caused by abnormal movement patterns during sidestepping or landing tasks with increased knee valgus motion and/or increased internal tibial rotation.
How do you prevent it? Focus on strengthening the core muscles, hip abductors and hip external rotators in order to prevent excessive knee valgus and/or internal tibial rotation. For example, loop a band around your stance leg (above the knee) and tie it to a stationary object so that the resistance of the band pulls the leg inward. Try to maintain that stance leg in neutral alignment (don’t let the knee cave in). Slowly lower yourself into a single leg squat position. Only go as far as you can with proper control of the leg. Repeat 10-15 repetitions for 2 sets.

2. Ankle Sprain

What is it? The ankle is made up of a series of ligaments that connect the bones and provide stability. Injury to the ankle can stretch or tear one or several of these ligaments.
Why does it happen? 50% of soccer related ankle injuries occur during contact with another player; otherwise it occurs during twisting, tackling or kicking. Have you already sprained your ankle? If so, you are 5x more likely to sprain it again.
How do you prevent it? Work on balance and proprioceptive exercises. Step/lunge onto a bosu (or pillow) from different angles. Repeat 10-15 repetitions per leg. As it gets easier you can progress to bounding onto the bosu and holding for control.

3. Achilles Tendonitis

What is it? Inflammation of the Achilles tendon, which attaches the calf muscles (the gastrocnemius and the soleus) to the heel bone.
Why does it happen? It is highly vulnerable to injury given the high amounts of tension put on it during sports. It can also be injured due to improper warm-up, muscle imbalances or poor footwear.
How do you prevent it? Strengthen your calves. Balance on a step and rise up onto your toes, then slowly lower yourself back down. Repeat 10-15 times for 2 sets. As it gets easier you can progress to doing one leg at a time.

4. Adductor Strain

What is it? The adductors are a group of muscles in the inner thigh that work together to stabilize the pelvis and move the hip. Injury usually involves a strain to one or more of these muscles.
Why does it happen? Kicking, changing direction and reaching put a large eccentric force on the adductor muscles, which puts them at risk for injury. Adductor strains are usually due to overuse and muscle imbalance.
How do you prevent it? Perform the Copenhagen adduction exercise. In a side plank position, rest on your elbow, raise your top leg and rest it on a bench. Your lower leg starts at the ground and you raise it towards your top leg. Slowly repeat 6-15 reps per side for 3 sets.

5. Hamstring Injury

What is it? The hamstrings are a group of 3 muscles at the back of your leg that help with hip and knee movements. Injury can involve a strain to the muscle or a full tear.
Why does it happen? Injury usually happens due to the high loads placed on the hamstrings during kicking and sprinting.
How do you prevent it? The Nordic hamstring exercise is one of the most widely used exercises to prevent hamstring injuries. Start from a kneeling position. Use a partner to hold your ankles or hook your feet under something heavy. Engage your core and hamstrings and slowly move forward towards the ground. Keep your hands ready to assume a push-up position. When your hands reach the ground push yourself back up. Try to go slow on the way down with control. Repeat 6-10 times for 2 sets.

If you’re looking for a sports medicine clinic in the Oakville and Mississauga area to treat your current injuries or help put together a program to prevent future injuries, contact Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic at 905-849-4576.

Book Your Appointment

Questions? Contact us

concussion management baseline test Oakville Mississauga 5

SPECIAL EVENT: Concussion Baseline Testing

We are currently offering athletes of all levels and sports who have not completed their Concussion Baseline Testing a special rate of 70$, when completed during our group sessions on Saturday May 26, 2018 from 8am-2pm. For more information or to make an appointment, please contact melanie@sheddonphysio.com for available times.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • The season has already started, are we too late for concussion baseline tests?
    • NO! Preseason is the ideal time for testing, but anytime during the year prior to a concussion is better than no baseline.
  • WIll the cost be covered through my insurance?
    • The cost of the baseline is covered under most Extended Health Plans since it is administered by a physiotherapist.
  • My child had a baseline done over a year ago, why should we do it again?
    • As young athletes mature, their baseline scores can change greatly from one year to the next. Therefore, it is recommended that athletes get a baseline at the beginning of each season.
  • My hockey team did the impact test preseason, isn’t that good enough?
    • No! Computerized neuropsychological tests, such as the ImPACT test are only assessing one aspect of concussions, neurocognitive function. In order to properly manage concussions a baseline test must be multidimensional, assessing the full spectrum of concussion outcomes (i.e., balance, reaction time, visual processing, physical capacity AND neurocognitive function). In order to know when an athlete has fully recovered, the different areas of the brain that could potentially be affected with a concussion must be assessed prior to and after a concussion.
  •  It’s not mandatory for my childs team.
    • Concussion baseline tests are becoming widely used in many sports at all levels. Although not mandatory (yet) in all high-risk sports, it is one of the most important and effective tools for concussion management. Without a baseline test there is no way to accurately know when an athlete has fully recovered from a concussion. Research has shown that concussion symptoms improve much sooner than brain recovery, which may put athletes at risk for returning to sport too quickly, especially if sport clearance is based solely on symptoms.
  •  Those dates don’t work for my child or team?
    • If you are part of a team or an individual who would like to participate in Concussion Baseline Testing but you cannot fit these dates into your schedule, please contact us and we will try to arrange for another date and time.

Please click here to learn about Concussion Baseline Testing and why it’s so important.

Book Your Appointment

Questions? Contact us

Sports Physio Plyometrics Oakville Soccer 2018 Sheddon Physioyherapy Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Jump your Game to the Next Level

To excel in any sport, athletes need to focus on strength and conditioning off field in order to enhance specific athletic parameters, which will benefit them in their sport/position. Fitness parameters such as strength, endurance, balance and flexibility are common in most training programs.  Athletes can also benefit from plyometric exercises, which involve quick actions like jumping, hopping, and bounding. These exercises are essential for developing power, speed, agility and prevention of injuries. WHAT are plyometric exercises? WHY should you do them? And HOW can you integrate them into your training?

WHAT are plyometric exercises?

Think about all the great natural movements you did as a kid, such as jumping onto and off of things, skipping, leaping, and hopping. These are the types of movements involved in plyometrics. More specifically, they are quick, explosive movements using maximum force repeated for short intervals.

WHY should you start doing them?

There are a number of great benefits to integrating plyometrics into your training. Research has shown that athletes who engage in plyometrics will have greater improvements in performance than players who simply focus on practice and games alone. Improvements include:

  • Increased ball striking speed;
  • Improved change of direction ability;
  • Increased acceleration;
  • Increased muscular power;
  • Increased kicking distance;
  • Improved agility;
  • Increase in joint awareness;
  • Injury prevention (especially ACL in young females)

HOW do you integrate them into your training program?

Plyometric exercises are not for beginners, as you should have a certain level of basic fitness first. Plyometrics combine strength and speed in order to develop max force over a short period of time. Therefore, the athlete needs to have a basic level of general strength and proper technique in movements such as squats prior to initiating these exercises. Below you will find some important practical considerations on where to start:

  • Most sports are multidirectional, therefore if you are looking to improve overall performance, you must include different exercises such as vertical (i.e., box jumps) and horizontal jumps (i.e., standing long jumps), as well as unilateral and bilateral drills. If you are interested in improving only certain aspects of your fitness, then the exercises should be specific to your performance goals. For example, if your goal is to increase running speed, choosing exercises such as bounding will have more gains than box jumps.
  • As with all exercises, QUALITY is key over QUANTITY. Proper technique is key for injury prevention and performance gains.
  • Follow an 8-10 week program, 2 days/week, with a 72-hour rest period in between training sessions in order to see the best gains.
  • Exercise sessions should last 10-20 minutes, and the best time is at the beginning of practice, after the initial warm up.
  • 3-4 plyometric exercises should be performed, 2-4 sets, for 6-15 reps per training session. DO NOT use extra weight. Body weight is sufficient, as added weight will NOT increase performance gains.
  • Avoid injury by ensuring the athlete is landing softly and with proper technique. Make sure whatever you are jumping onto/over is stable and not too high. Also make sure the exercise surface is safe (avoid concrete and uneven surfaces), grass or turf is safest.

At Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic we work with  coaches and trainers to make sure that injured athletes are properly rehabbed. We also play a role in injury prevention and enhancing performance gains so athletes can bring their game to the next level. Whether you’re returning from an injury, want to prevent future injuries or just want to improve your performance, chat with a therapist at Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic about which exercises are best for you.

Bedoya et al., (2015). Plyometric training effects on athletic performance in youth soccer athletes: A systematic review. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning. 29,8, 2351-2360.

Wang et al., (2016). Effects of Plyometric Training on Soccer Players (Review). Experimental and Theurapeutic Medicine. 550-554.

Balancing Injury Prevention and performance 2018 Sheddon Physioyherapy Sports Clinic Oakville Mississauga

Balancing Injury Prevention and Performance Gains

Every athlete wants to train in order to improve their performance, while at the same time decreasing their risk of injury. Is it possible that certain exercises can kill two birds with one stone? Current research has shown that balance training exercises may do just that.

Balance exercises can prevent injuries, with research proving that poor balance is a major risk factor for lower body injuries. Balance exercises have long been shown to decrease the risk of ankle injures by 35-50%. Furthermore, balance training is also beneficial in preventing knee injuries, especially to the ACL. Balance training isn’t just for athletes, the elderly can also reduce their risk of falls with a few simple exercises.

More recently, balance training has been proven to improve athletic performance/motor skills across a number of different sports. For example, research has shown that balance exercises improve:

  • Rifle shooting accuracy;
  • Ice hockey maximum speed;
  • Luge start speed;
  • Vertical jumps;
  • Overall agility;
  • Shuttle run times

How Much, How Often, and Which Exercises?

There are endless possibilities of exercises an athlete can choose from. Generally speaking, balance training would begin on a stable surface and progress to unstable surfaces (i.e., bosu ball, balance discs, trampolines, etc.). One can begin with holding a position and progress to destabilization (ball throwing/catching, strengthening exercises, external perturbations by a partner). See our video below which integrates balance with hand-eye coordination.

Hand-eye coordination with lower body exercises. #thinkoutsidethebox #proprio #proprioception #exercise #balance #highleveltraining

Posted by Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic on Friday, February 9, 2018

Athletes can begin with their eyes open and progress to eyes closed. Likewise, beginning with a double leg stance and progress to a single leg stance. Ideally, the exercises should eventually be sport specific. See our video below on balance progression for a high level hockey player.

High level proprioception drills for hockey. An important part of lower quadrant rehab. #sheddon #sheddonphysio #sportsphysiotherapy #sportstherapy #physio #chiro #physiotherapy #physicaltherapy #sports #injury #injurymanagement #rehab #chiropractic #oakvilleontario #burlington #mississauga #healthybody #stretch #hockey #ohl #kneepain

Posted by Sheddon Physiotherapy and Sports Clinic on Monday, February 5, 2018

Research has shown the best results occur when balance training is done 2-3x/week, 10-15 minute at a time, for at least 3-4 months. Also, the younger you start working on balance with athletes the better.

If you want to learn more about balance exercises, chat with one of the therapists at SPSC for more information.

Brachman et al., (2017). Balance training programs in athletes – a systematic review. Journal of Human Kinetics. 58, 1,
Hrysomallis et al., (2011). Balance Ability and Athletic Performance. Sports Medicine. 41,3,221-232.